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In Retrospect: The Game-Changing Brilliance of Soda Stereo and Gustavo Cerati

  • TempoRempo

    Thanks for this. What a great musician Cerati. I’m a European living in Costa Rica and I first saw Soda Stereo here on tv. It was their famous show in Viña del Mar in 87 or 88. Just like you I was hooked immediately. I now somewhat prefer his solo work over Soda Stereo. But I don’t like Siempre es Hoy much.

  • Sebastian Demaria

    Be ready for the new Cirque du soleil show based on Soda Stereo s ” El septimo dia ” (the seventh day).

    • I hope it comes to the NY area, though the last I checked the tour dates it looks like they’re sticking to South America.

  • Good intro/overview. I first got into them when “Sueno Stereo” came out. I heard “Paseando Por Roma” on a sampler and was hooked. I’ve been a fan ever since. It baffled me that they weren’t bigger Stateside.

    • Dario Lucero

      I’m glad you found them I was born in Argentina where I lived until 11 when my parents moved to Canada my older brother was obsessed with them and all that was heard throughout the house was soda stereo it marked my teenage years as I got older and moved out i stopped listening but every time I hear one of their songs it brings back wonderful memories there is an English version of the hit cuando pase el temblor when the shaking has passed look it up on you tube and enjoy the best rock band in the history of Latin America they remind me a lot of the British band the cure cheers

      • I heard that (and an English version of “Juegos de Seduccion” that came from the same sessions). Even though I don’t understand much Spanish, the English lyrics didn’t sound right somehow.

        I’m curious how much other stuff is in the vaults, whether it’s Cerati solo, or Soda Stereo outtakes. I’m grateful for what they did, but I guess I’d always hoped there’d be more.

        • Dario Lucero

          To conquer the Latin American market they had to make an effort to sing in a more neutral Spanish our brand of Spanish is heavily influenced by Italian due to the millions that migrated to Argentina at the turn of the century and after ww2 two thirds of us,including my maternal grandparents,have full or some kind of blood link to the land of the pasta so it must have been challenging for them let alone doing the English crossover and I think that’s is definitely the main reason why they didn’t explode worldwide let’s face it in music English rules but other than than his vocals are world class are well as his lyrics and instrumental skills Gustavo cerati was a genius

          • I always wondered about that. I had a friend years back who was a porteño, and his accent (when he was speaking English) and intonation (when he was speaking Spanish) always had something Italian about them.

            I suppose English-language stuff (or whatever’s being sung in the local language wherever you happen to find yourself) is always going to be most popular — practically nobody in the States was paying attention to Shakira before she started singing in English — but on the other hand, “Macarena” was a huge hit around the same time that Soda Stereo was winding down, so…

            That could also be a matter of the beat; reggaetón gets plenty of airplay on the dance stations around here (or did for a while, anyway), but you won’t hear the same kind of crossover on rock stations usually, outside of public radio.

  • Makes more sense than the version I saw on Google Translate. :) I’d be curious to hear your version once it’s done.

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